Jabiru 3300 - Disassembly

Introduction ...

This page contains photos of a Jabiru 3300A Solid Lifter engine being disassembled as part of a bulk strip and rebuild.



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Make a start by mounting the engine to the adjustable height work bench. Six bolts are used to bolt the propeller flange to the work bench. We can raise or lower the work table to more easily facilitate working on the engine. Once engine is securely mounted we can begin the disassembly process by removing the induction pipes. Undo the allen head bolts that secure the upper induction pipes to the cylinder head. Next we can remove the induction hose which serves to join the upper and lower induction pipes. Next the lower induction hoses may be removed from the induction body and diffuser assembly. The lower induction pipes are held in place partly by o-rings and partly by gasket compound. As the gasket compound will have set reasonably solidly the pipe will have to be twisted back gently until it releases. Place the induction pipes in the relevant parts tray for the particular cylinder you are working on ...

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Here we see all 6 cylinders induction pipes have been removed ...

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The induction chamber may now be removed ...

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There are several bolts that need to be removed ...

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Here is the engine with induction body removed ...

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And the induction body on the bench ...

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Next we can remove the distributor caps. There are secured in place with a pair distributor cap clips retained in by an allen head bolt ...

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Remove the the distributor cap clips and the caps should be free to pull off ...

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Here are the clips on the bench ...

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Next we can remove the starter motor ...

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Next we can remove the mechanical fuel pump ...

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Remove these two bolts and ease the fuel pump off the crankcase ...

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One of the two fuel pump gaskets has remained bonded to the crankcase ...

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Fuel pump on the bench shown with the plastic gasket spacer ...

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Next remove the four bolts (accessible from the upper surface) that secure the alternator mount and lift it cleanly and squarely away from the engine being mindful of the fact that there are four locator roll pins that are potentially easy to damage ...

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And here is the alternator mount on the bench ...

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Here is a better view of one of the locator roll pins that has been retained in the alternator mount

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A close up of the alternator coil itself ...

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And here we get a view of the rear plate engine mount with some of the alternator roll pins retained in it ...

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A few diferent views of the flywheel for reference ...

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Next to be removed are the rocker covers. Remove the four allen head cap bolts per cylinder and place the removed parts on the relevant parts tray for that cylinder ...

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And one of the rocker covers on the bench ...

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And a view of one of the cylinder heads with the rocker cover removed ...

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A view of cylinders 2,4 and 6 with all rocker covers removed ...

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We can start to slacken of the 5 cylinder head bolts with a view to removing the cylinder heads. The cylider head bolt being removed in this image is concealed behind a 1/8th NPT plug (tapered thread) ...

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Once the cylinder head bolts are removed the rubber T-pipes that connect to the cylinder head lube tubes must be slackened off and genlty slid off the lube tubes. Once this has been done the cylinder heads should release ...

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And here is cylinder head from cylinder 5 removed ...

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And here you can see the pushrod tubes and pushrods remain in the crankcase ...

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One cylinder head on the bench ...

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The cylinder head valve train oil feed pipe may now be removed. This is retained by an allen head cap bolt and specially designed washer ...

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Now is as good a time as any to remove the wire loop and air baffles from the cylinder barrels ...

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Snip the wire loop ...

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Place the air baffles and the springs that hold the wire loops taught in the relevant parts tray ...

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View of cylinder No. 5's barrel ...

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Cylinder head 3 and 5 removed ...

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Note the AVGAS lead and carbon deposits on the piston crown ...

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All three cylinder heads on this side of the engine together with valve train oil feed pipes and pushrod tubes removed ...

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Note again the piston crown deposits ...

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Next we can remove the flywheel. There are six bolts that must be removed (only four of which we can see in this image) ...

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Note that the 6 flywheel allen head cap bolts have been removed (long red arrows). Also note that depsite the flywheel hub having 6mm dowel holes drilled in it (short red arrows) to accomodate the 6mm dowel pins there are no dowel pins fitted. There is a Mandatory SB that covers the requirement to fit a set of 3 dowel pins ...

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The removed flywheel bolts on the bench ...

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Next we can removed the distributor rotor arms off the rotor arm shafts ...

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The rotor arm shaft with rotor arms removed ...

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The flywheel can now be eased off and placed in a parts tray ...

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And here is a view of the gear housing ...

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The crank gear ...

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The crank gear oil seal ...

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The gear housing retaining bolts can now be slackened off and the gear housing removed ...

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The gear housing on the bench ...

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And a view of the now exposed gearbox ...

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The crank gear may now be lifted off ...

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And here it is on the bench ...

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Note that this is the "older" thin-walled version ...

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And here is the end of the crankshaft with the crank gear removed. Note the six threaded holes that accomodate the six flywheel retaining bolts. Also the camshaft timing locator pin hole (red arrow) ...

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Also not the flywheel dowel pin holes for 6mm dowel pins ...

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The rotor arm shaft still rivited to it's gear ...

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Note for extra security the rotor arm is bonded with epoxy resin to the end of the rotor arm shaft. It's not a great image but it is possible to see the remains of the previous installation epoxy still bonded to the end of the rotor arm shaft. This will need to be cleaned up before new rotor arms can be fitted ...

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Next we can slacked off the bolts and remove the engine mounting plate ...

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Here we can see the camshaft end gear ...

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And again the alternator end of the crankshaft ...

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It is now possible to unbolt and remove the oil sump ...

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And here is the sump on the bench and this particular one has very thick sludgy deposits in the bottom so will benefit from a good clean ...

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Now we can start to remove the thru bolt nuts, bolts and cylinder barrels. Note the use of the crows foot torque wrench adapter to gain asccess to the barrel nuts. Because we are undoing the nuts for disassembly rather than torque'ing them up during assembly it is not necessary to maintain the crows foot right angle ...

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The barrels can be removed in any order ...

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When this engine previously had a top end overhaul it looks as though it were reassembled erooneously with a high temperature loctite (I'm guessing Loctite 620) becasue the thru bolts have a very hard blue green residue on them that shouldn't be there! Some of the bolts had to be secured in a vice to facilitate removal of the 12 point nuts. Never use heat on thru bolts (if they have been loctite'd as these have) as this can affect their hardness / tensile strength ...

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All barrels removed. A few different views ...

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Note a significant build up of lead and carbon deposits. Most of the piston rings where seized solid in their landings ...

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And some images of the crankcase unsplit with crankshaft and camshaft still in place but with the pistons removed ...

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Remove the dipstick housing assembly by ...

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Removing the grub screw from the dipstick mount adapter with a suitable allen key ...

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Dipstick housing tube on the bench ...

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Remove the oil filter and then remove the oil cooler adapter (see arrow) ...

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And here is the oil cooler adapter on the bench ...

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Remove the oil pump ...

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And the oil pump backing plate ...

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The four oil pump allen head cap screws ...

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You may now start your preparations for splitting the crankcases. So when we split the crackcases we will have four major components to physically handle. Firstly the two crankcase halves. Next is the crankshaft. This is currently bolted to the adjustable height engine table so that's going nowhere until we unbolt it. Finally the camshaft pictured here with timing gear still attached. When the crankcase halves are forced apart they will need to be carefully parted from the crankshaft and placed on the relevant parts tray ensuring none of the bearings, thrust bearings or solid lifters fall off in the process. If you have more than one set of hands then your assitant can look after the crankcases whilst you prevent the camshaft from falling away from the crankscases and becoming damaged. If you don't have access to another pair of hands then tying a wire from the timimg gear to a hook screwed into the ceiling (or something solid) above will help to ensure the camshaft sustains no damage. The plan is that whilst you handle the other three main parts the camshaft will simply hang from the wire until you have some free hands to disentangle the suspension wire ...

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A few images of the crankcase halves coming apart ...

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Make absolutely sure that you bring no pressure to bear directly on any of the mating surfaces of the crankcase halves. Instead use a rubber mallet to gently tap the crankcase halves apart ...

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Finally we have released one of the crankcase halves ...

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One crankcase half on the bench ...

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Close up of some of the shells ...

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