Rotax 582 mod 99 (Blue Top)Strip, Service,& Rebuild

Introduction ...

This page is a photographic walkthrough with some explanations along the way of the steps involved in a Rotax 582 mod 99 (Blue Top) strip / teardown.




Original installation

Here are some photos of the engine before removing it from the aircraft

View Larger Image ...



ALT text here

Here it is removed from aircraft on the workshop bench

View Larger Image ...











ALT text here

Rotax 582 mod99 strip-down ...

Here is the Ro9tax 582 minus any gearbox ...

View Larger Image ...



ALT text here

Removing the starter motor cover ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Starter motor and it's cover removed ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Engine with no starter motor ...

View Larger Image ...


ALT text here

Removing the cylinder head coolant outlet elbow ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The cylinder head coolant outlet elbow on the bench ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Remove the E-box supporting plate with the E-boxes still attached ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

E-boxes removed from the supporting plate ...

View Larger Image ...


ALT text here

The engine with the E-box supporting plate and E-Boxes removed ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Removing the carb rubbers ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Engine with carb rubbers off ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

RV (rotary valve) cover removed and on the bench ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Other side of the RV cover ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Note the RV cover o-ring ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Engine with RV valve exposed ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Using a dial gauge to find TDC MAG end cylinder to verify correct position of RV valve ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

This is the position it should be in at TDC MAG end cylinder ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Close up of dial gauge in cylinder ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Turning our attention to the MAG end of engine.

We start by removing the starter gear ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The hydro damper assembly exposed ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Gently prising the hydro damper assembly off taking great care not to damage or mark the crankcase ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The hydro damper assembly removed and on the bench ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The magneto flywheel is now exposed ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Rotax's flywheel removal tool. This is used both to lock the flywheel and pull the magneto flywheel off. If you rely on the crankshaft locking pin to lock the crankcase you could potentially twist the press-fit crankshaft. Not good! ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Initially we only use the outer ring of the flywheel removal tool to lock the crank whilst we remove the nut ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Removing the nut ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The nut removed - note the powdered loctite ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Using a telescopic magnet to remove the lock washer ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Protection cap for protecting the end of the crankshaft when the magneto flywheel removal tool is used to pull the flywheel ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

A bit of blue tack is handy for ensuring that the protection cap doesn't fall out during the tightening process ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The protection cap in place on the end of the crankshaft ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The puller part of the flywheel removal tool is screwed into the outer ring ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The bolt is tightened and the magneto flywheel should be released ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Magneto flywheel and the part of the removal tool on the bench ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Flipped over so that you can see the other side ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Flywheel nut and lock washer on the bench ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Stator plate and coil kit exposed ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Loosening and removing the rubber cable grommet ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Undoing the ignition pick-ups / triggers ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Here you can see the later type of slotted pick-up on the bench ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

And a close-up of the pick-ups on the engine ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Removing the stator plate. It is not necessary to remove the coil kit from the stator plate to get the stator plate out - they can be removed as a joint unit. This is a relatively delicate unit and the les handling it gets the better ...

View Larger Image ...


ALT text here

Gently removing the stator plate whilst teasing the cabling through the crankshaft grommet hole ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

This bunch of wires needs to go through the grommet hole. You will need to remove the P-clip first and then push the bunch of cables through ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Stator plate and coil kit removed and on the bench ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Engine with all ignition related components removed from mag end of engine ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The bent water outlet socket needs to be removed ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The bent water outlet socket on the bench ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The old gasket needs to be removed ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Cylinder head with water outlet socket gasker removed ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The water pump housing is removed ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The water pump housing removed and on the bench ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Note the build up of old coolant deposits and corrosion that will have been impeding the flow of coolant around the engine. This needs to be cleaned out before re-assembly ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

View of the water pump impeller on the engine

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Remove the nut on the end of the RV shaft that holds the water pump impeller in place ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The water pump impeller on the bench ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The friction washer needs to be removed ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Rotax's RV shaft protection tool screwed on the end of the RV shaft to facilitate removal by tapping it with a rubber mallet ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Before the RV shaft can be tapped out the circlip must be removed from the other end of the rotary valve shaft ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The circlip loosened ready to be removed ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The RV shaft circlip on the bench ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Now the RV shaft can be tapped through from the other end ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The RV shaft removed and on the bench ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The RV shaft with the removal tool on the bench ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Removing the outer seal of the RV shaft. This is likely to be rendered unusuable during removal as it comes out in multiple pieces ...

View Larger Image ...


ALT text here

The inner section of the seal is the trickiest part to remove partly due to the fact that it is recessed ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The RV shaft inner seal exposed ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The small RV shaft bearing exposed after the inner seal has been removed ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Here you can see the various part of the outer ceramic race type seal (upper in photo) and the rubber inner seal on the bench ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Loosening the cylinder head bolts ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The blue top ready to lift off ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The cylinder head inverted on the bench ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Close up of the carbon on the cylinder head ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

And again from a shallower angle ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Bule top cylinder on the bench ready for cleaning ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Close up of coolant deposits ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

View of cylinder barrels and piston crowns ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Closer up ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Note the corroded cylinder bolts inside ...

View Larger Image ...



ALT text here

Remove the silicon seals from the cylinder head with a pick ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Undo bolts securing the cylinder barrel to the crankcase ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

All bolts undone ready for removal ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Using a telescopic magnet to remove the bolts ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Cylinder bolts showing signs of corrosion ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Close up of one of the exhaust ports. Note the carbon build up here as well ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Here is a view of the inside of cylinder barrel. Note the cross hatching or knurling. This crass hatching provides some very fine recesses for oil to reside. If this knurling is not visible then cylinder is probably beyond it's wear limit. This one looks to be in good shape subject to cleaning ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Here's a view from the other end of the barrel. Note that the cross hatching is still present which is good but that there are also some longitudinal scratches possible caused by either carbon deposits from the piston crown getting dislodged and finding their way down or just from excessive carbon build up on the piston rings.

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Another angle ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Here is ennigne with cylinders off. Note the excessive carbon build-up on piston crowns, rings and piston skirt. These piston rings were well and truely stuck in their grooves. This means that they were unable to expand into the cylinder wall to present the best contact between piston and cylinder wall and it is likely that compression would compromised becuase of this ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Another angle ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

A view from the side of the piston showing excessive carbon build up around the piston pin retaining circlips ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Removing the piston pin retaining circlips ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Rotax's piston pin and cageless bearing removal tool. This one has been slighty mod'd to make it useful in leass accessible installations ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The cageless bearing removal tool inserted through the piston pin ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Pulling the piston pin out ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Here you can see marking on the side of the tool that tell you how far the tool must be unscrewed so that the piston pin will be in the right position for lifting piston off. On my tool it says 587 which I'm guessing was supposed to say 582!

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Here is the exposed conrod with cageless bearing in one piece and still inside ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The cageless bearing is pushed out of the conrod eye and into this plastic sleeve. There are 31 bearing pins in total and if not properly supported can fall into the crankcase. If you were just doing a de-coke and weren't splitting the crank then it is vital that these don't fall down inside the crankcase otherwise you will probably find yourself splitting the crankcase unnecessarily just to retrieve them.

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Plan view of the inside of the piston, the cageless bearing supoorted on the outside by the plastic sleeve and compressed from the inside by a spring loaded internal sleeve which comes with the piston pin removal tool. Note also the two thrust washers that go either side of the cageless bearing ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Another angle ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The engine with pistons removed ...

View Larger Image ...


ALT text here

Pistons, bearings and thrust washers etc almost ready for decarboning ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Applying a little heat to expand the piston to facilitate easier removal of the part removed piston pin ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Piston assemblies on bench with piston pins. If you are going to re-use any of these parts then it is important to keep all the parts from each piston together and not mix them up! Off to the ultrasonic cleaner for these pistons ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Close up of the piston crown ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Engine inverted so that conrods can hang freely ready to undo crankcase bolts ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Crankcase bolts removed ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Cautiously prising the crankcase halfs apart with a blunt screw driver. Note it is very important the you make use of the prising points so that crankcase mating surfaces are not scratched or damaged ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Bottom half of the crancase removed to expose crankshaft ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Some corroded crankcase bolts that will need replacing ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Crankshaft removed ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Another view. Off to the ultrasonic bath with the crankcases ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Crankshaft on the bench ready for measuring ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Here you can see how much residue is left in the ultrasonic bath ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Using the specialist Rotax tool for removing the RV shaft small bearing ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

RV shaft small bearing and it's retaining circlip on the bench ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The crankcases on their return from the ultrasonic bath and aqua-blaster ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

View of inside of the crankcases ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

View of bottom crankcase half. Note that the bearing seats are in good condition and show no evidence of the bearings spinning. Subject to checking that the mating surfaces are flat these crankcases are good to go ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Here is a handy wooden tressle for supporting the upper crankcase half for when the crankshaft is refitted / replaced. It supports the crankcase whilst allowing the cranksshaft to be lowered in with conrods hanging down under their own weight ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The upper crankcase on the tressle ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Inspecting / measuring some of the vital wear items before rebuilding ...

measuring the diameter of the piston skirts ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Using an internal mic and calipers to measure the cylinder wear from inlet to exhaust port ...

View Larger Image ...


ALT text here

Measuring piston ring flank clearance ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Measuring the piston ring end gap in place in the cylinder barrel ...

View Larger Image ...


ALT text here

Measuring cylinder out of round. We measured the cylinder from inlet port to outlet port. Here we take a measure at 90 degrees to that first measurement to arrive at an out of round measurement ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Measuring MAG end crankshaft out of round with crankshaft supoorted by some V-blocks ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Measuring PTO end crankshaft out of round ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Checking crankshaft bearing play ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Measuring axial clearance of the big-end thrust washers ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Cleaning the crankcase halves with Isopropyl alcohol in readiness for applying loctite ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Rotax's rebuild kit for a Rotax 582 mod 99 ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

View of new crankshaft seals on the bench ...

View Larger Image ...


ALT text here

Applying Loctite 518 to upper crankcase. Loctite 574 would do the job just as well ...

View Larger Image ...


ALT text here

Crankshaft gently lowered back into postion ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Checking that all crankshaft seals locate correctly in their grooves ...

View Larger Image ...



ALT text here

Applying Loctite to crankcase bolts ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Re-fitting lower crankcase cover ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Replacing the bolts ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

And torquing them up. I usually do this by working my way out diagonaly from the centre and progressively turning the torque up from 20% of final torque to 40%, to 60%, to 80%, and finally to 100% of the desired torque. Some may consider this to be excessively cautious but for the samll amount of extra time it takes it is worth it to my mind. Ensuring that the crankcase are tightened evenly and without any distortion is vital to ensuring that the engine runs smoothly. Remember the torque needs to be checked post run-in once the engine has cooled down.

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Crankcases now tightened ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Excess loctite is removed ...

View Larger Image ...


ALT text here

The engine is then mounted back on the rebuild tressle / support ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Close visual inspection of PTO end cranshaft seal to check that it is properly seated ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Close visual inspection of MAG end cranshaft seal to check that it is properly seated ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Supporting the conrod during piston replacement. I made fabricated a rubber and wood support that serves to support the conrod and also prevent it damaging the mating surface of the crankcase below that it might otherwise be inclined to rest against ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Here are some new cageless bearings ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Applying lithium greas to the small end of conrod ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Pusing the new cageless bearing out of their plastic carriage sleeve and into the conrod ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Position the thrust washers. The lithium grease also helps to hold the thrust washers in place ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The piston pin / gudgeon pin on the bench. This one looks good - very slight discolouration due to usual running temps. Also check for wear. The wear limit on this component is 0.001" so its best to run your thumbnail down the length of the pin and see if you can feel if any grooves have been worn - if so it must be replaced. If it feels absolutely smooth it is good to be re-fitted ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Applying some heat to expand the piston suffiently to partially push piston pin bach in ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Applying some lithium grease to help ease it part way back into the piston...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

This is how far it needs to be pushed back in initially ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Piston is offered up to the conrod eye and the piston removal tool is re-inserted and will be used to pull the pin back in. A little more hear is helpfull to ease the piston pin into place ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Pulling the pin through ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Using Rotax's circlip replacement tool for replacing the circlips. It is important that the piston is supported when you tap the rubber mallet so avoid any unecessary sideway force on the conrod ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

One side of the piston showing circlip replaced ...

View Larger Image ...


ALT text here

A visual check of the inside of the piston to check that both thrust washer are there and in the correct position ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Using a pick to check that all 31 cageless bearing pins are presently. There should be virtually no gap between the pins ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Both pistons replaced ...

View Larger Image ...


ALT text here

Fitting new cylinder base gasket ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Applying 2-stroke to the piston to enable cylinders to be re-fitted more easily and without damage ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Applying 2-stroke to the cylinder barrel ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

After ensuring that the piston rings are in the correct position (aligned with their locator pegs) offer up the cylinder to the piston easing the piston rings into cylinder barrel ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Allow the cylinder to be lowered onto base gasket removing the rubber and wood supporting plate along the way ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Both cylinder replaced ...

View Larger Image ...


ALT text here

Using Rotax's cylinder alignment tool to ensure that there is sufficient gap between the cylinders to allow for thermal expansion when the engine is upto operating temperature ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Before the alignment tools are tightend into postion insert hex collar bolts into the base of the cylinders ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Using the exhaust manifold also temporarily as an alignment tool the hex collar bolts can be torque'd up ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Now that the hex collar bolts are back in the alignment tools and exhaust manifold can be replaced ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Here are the cylinder top rubber ring and silicon o-rings due to be re-fitted ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Blasting the channels / grooves they fint in respectivley with an airgun to ensure that no debris interferes with the seal ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The cylinder top rubber ring and silicon o-rings in position ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Replacing the cylinder head making sure to apply some Loctite 518 or RTV to the cylinder head bolts to safe guard again coolant seeping out of them ...

View Larger Image ...


ALT text here

Starter ring is re-fitted ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The cylinder head coolant bent outlet socket is replaced with fresh gasket ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

items on the bench to re-fit ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Striping and rebuilding RV shaft with new seals and o-ring etc ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Using the hydraulic press the larger bearing is removed to that the larger oil seal that it holds captive can be replaced ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

It is important that the bearing is properly supported whilst shaft is pressed out. Note the white plate. Also note the RV shaft end protection tool screwed onto the water pump impeller end of RV shaft. This is to protect the threads on the end of the RV shaft ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

RV shaft large bearing has been removed and now it is possible to replace the larger oil seal ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

RV shaft components striped and on the bench. Now is a good time to take a really close look at the RV shaft. Look for wear caused by oil seals rotating against the shaft. Examine the centre brass gear for excessive wear or any other damage ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

RV shaft with new larger oil seal back in place ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Replacing the bearing, spacer sleeve, o-ring etc ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Replacing the o-ring ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Close up of brass gear ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Rebuilding the remainder of the RV shaft pictured here with the old larger oil seal and o-ring on the bench ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

View of small bearing inside the water pump area of the crankcase ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Rotax's insertion tool for re-indserting the RV shaft inner bearing ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

With the seal in place ready to push in ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

And the seal once it has been pushed home ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

RV shaft outer seal / ceramic race on the bench ...

View Larger Image ...


ALT text here

Rotax's ceramic race outer seal insertion tool in position on the engine ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Rotax's ceramic race outer seal insertion tool is tightened pushing the outer seal into place ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Ceramic race seal once it is in place on engine ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The RV shaft can now be pushed in from the other side of the engine. Note the use of lithium grease to easy the large oil seal in without damage ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Initially it can be very gently encouraged in with a rubber mallet ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

And for the last part of pushing back in the Rotax RV shaft replacement insertion tool is used to protect the sline onto which the rotary valve resides ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

RV shaft fully pushed home ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

RV shaft circlip required to hold the RV shaft in place ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

replacing RV shaft circlip ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Now the RV shaft is securely back in position the water pump components can be refitted to the otherside ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The friction washer is placed on the RV shaft ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Then the water pump impeller itself ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Followed by the washer and finally the locknut ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

A new waterpump gasket is fitted and then the water pump housing replaced ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Next the ignition pick-ups are replaced ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Newe ignition coil kit to stator plate allen bolts are replaced as the existing are showing signs of corrosion ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Refitting the stator plate and ignition coil kit as one unit ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Once both pick-ups are roughly in place and tightened so that they are clear of the magneto flywheel then the magneto flywheel is re-fitted ensiring that the groove on the flywheel aligns with the woodruff key on the crankshaft ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The friction washer and nut on the bench ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The friction washer and nut are loosely tightened ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Next a dial gauge is inserted into cylinders one at a time and the timing set ...

View Larger Image ...


ALT text here

The correct clearance between pickup and magneto flywheel is set ...

View Larger Image ...


ALT text here

The outer ring of the flywheel puller tool is reattached to the flywheel to imobilise it whilst the flywheel nut is torque'd up. It is not advisable to rely on the crankshaft locking pin to imobilise the crankshaft as you may just end up with a twisted crank - remember the 582 crankshaft is a thermal interference fit and could concievably slip in which case your cylinders would be out of phase ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Applying the correct torque to the flywheel nut ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The flywheel puller tool outer ring is removed and the starter gear is replaced ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Next the rotary valve can be replaced on it's locating spline on the RV shaft ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Replacing the rotary valve lubrication feed hose. Now both the RV housing and the igntion supporting plate with ignition E-box's attached can be re-fitted to the engine. There is a replacement o-ring for the RV shaft housing / cover in the engine rebuild kit that must be replaced ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The carb rubbers are re-fitted ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Flash view showing rotary valve behind the rotary valve housing ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The coolant thermostat can now be refitted ...

View Larger Image ...


ALT text here

Here is the PTO end of the engine with no gearbox fitted ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Gearbox flywheel is refitted ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Rotax's specialist tool for re-fitting the rubber coupling ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

What can happen to the bolts if you don't use the correct tool ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The rubber coupling is bolted to the flywheel ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The Type-C gearbox housing can now be re-fitted ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The eight bolts (4 inside and 4 outside) can now be re-fitted ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The gearset small gear can now be re-fitted. Note the all important shim that goes behind it. This is to accomodate the offset due to the thickness of the gearbox gasket ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The small gear allen bolt is re-fitted and torque'd up ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Once the small gear allen bolt is re-fitted the gearbox housing bolts can be torque'd up ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Fitting a new gearbox gasket ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Here is the gearbox cover together with the main gear mounted on the prop shaft ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The gear cover is offered up to the gearbox housing and eased into place. It helps to rotate crankshaft a little to help the main gear and small gear to mesh ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Re-fitting gearbox cover bolts ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

The gearbox is re-filled with gearbox oil and the magnetic plug is safe tied. This engine is refitted to aircraft in an inverted configuration so one inverted the magnetic cap will be at the bottom ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

If you have a starter motor fitted to your aircraft it is a good idea to disassemble it. Then you can verify the condition of the brushes and give it a good clean paying particular attention to restoring a good connection between the brushes and the commutator. This image is after commutator has been cleaned. The commutator was barely visible before! ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Inspect the brushes ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Re-assemble the starter motor and re-attach it to the starter cover ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Lubricate the starter gear in readiness for the starter cover to be re-fitted ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Starter motor cover and starter motor is re-fitted to engine ...

View Larger Image ...

ALT text here

Here are a few images of the rebuilt engine taken from a few different angles ...

View Larger Image ...




ALT text here

The engine is ready to re-fit to aircraft ...

View Larger Image ...